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That they pay you for doing something you love is a no-brainer.

So why not try to turn your favorite pastime into a thriving career?

Here, Leah Milner and Rosie Taylor talk to six inspiring entrepreneurs, all over 50, about how they have managed to do just that …

It used to be a big cheese, now I sell it!

In 2016, John, who is now 70, and his eldest daughter Clare Jackson, 42 (pictured above), bought a deli in Aldeburgh, Suffolk.

In 2016, John, who is now 70, and his eldest daughter Clare Jackson, 42 (pictured above), bought a deli in Aldeburgh, Suffolk.

After almost half a century working in the City, John Ormerod did not want to simply put his feet up when he retired. He had always liked cheese, but the inspiration surprised him when his children bought him a gift voucher for a cheese shop and realized how much he enjoyed chatting with the vendors about his products.

Then, in 2016, John, who is now 70, and his eldest daughter Clare Jackson, 42, bought a delicatessen in Aldeburgh, Suffolk. A year later, they changed their name as a specialized cheese vendor called Slate and bought another store in the vicinity of Southwold.

The two stores, along with their online store, slatecheese.co.uk, now generate £ 525,000 a year. John works in stores every two weekends and for several weeks in the summer, when coastal cities are at their busiest.

"For me, social interaction is so important," he says. "When you have a busy career, it's difficult to spend as much time as you'd like with your family, but now I talk to my daughter several times a day and I see my grandchildren all the time, that's a real luxury that I can." enjoy. & # 39;

Advice: Join forces with a younger family member to share skills and knowledge. Your combined experience will make your business even stronger.

Our blog recharges our pensions.

The old friends Annabel Simons, 60 years old (top left), and Grace Carnegie-Brown, 66 (right), left jobs in television and administration in London and now have a blog about rural life.

The old friends Annabel Simons, 60 years old (top left), and Grace Carnegie-Brown, 66 (right), left jobs in television and administration in London and now have a blog about rural life.

When old friends Annabel Simons, 60, and Grace Carnegie-Brown, 66, left the television and administration jobs in London to move to the country, they began emailing funny stories to friends to keep in touch.

Their anecdotes were so popular that the couple decided to launch countrywives.co.uk, a blog about rural life. It now has 750,000 readers, and advertisers like M & S and JD Williams pay to promote their products on the site.

Working from their homes in Henley-on-Thames and West Sussex, Annabel and Grace earn enough to pay a small salary along with their pensions.

"It was just a hobby, but it became a business," says Annabel, a mother of four children. "Our age group is nervous about buying online, so we tried products we recommend to make sure they are suitable for older women."

Advice: Define your niche "Our blog is successful because we know our readers and tailored items, fashion tips and recipe ideas to satisfy their tastes."

Frank McKenzie has loved selling booties since he was a child.

Frank McKenzie has loved selling booties since he was a child.

Jumble sales made me millions

Frank McKenzie has loved theft through the sales of auto boots since he was a child. But the retired accountant, 61, has now turned his ability to detect valuable antiques into a multi-million pound business.

With a young family to support, Frank initially started a career in finance. Then, in the early 2000s, as the Internet emerged, he began to buy and sell online trinkets.

"The web gave me access to incredible finds from around the world: I was selling the mess of the 1970s and recreating for the 21st century," he says.

And when he sold a brass inkwell he had bought for £ 40 at an antique store for £ 2,650 on eBay, Frank knew he was into something. So he decided to take a step back from accounting and started doing business with his eldest son, Joe, who had begun to restore and sell old watches.

The couple began to trade with art, antiques and jewelry in Frank's garage, before obtaining offices in Hertfordshire. Today, they have an online boom business through their website, xupes.com, 40 employees and last year they delivered over £ 11 million.

Frank says: "I do not think he'll ever quit the job." A true entrepreneur will never retire because they are always discovering new opportunities.

Advice: With a solid website, you can sell your products to customers around the world.

My work as a detective paid off

Steve Gaskin's detective company, rightangleevents.co.uk, has been in business for 12 years and generates around £ 1.5 million annually. His wife Kate is an employee. Above, the husband and wife team.

Steve Gaskin's detective company, rightangleevents.co.uk, has been in business for 12 years and generates around £ 1.5 million annually. His wife Kate is an employee. Above, the husband and wife team.

When Steve Gaskin retired from the 45-year-old police force, after nearly three decades of service, he knew that his detective skills should have other uses. He became a professor of mathematics and head of education at Norwich Prison, and that's when the germ of a business plan was formed.

"When you have a significant position in the police force, you learn how to be a good leader and train others to get the best results," says Steve, who is now 62 years old. "When you're working on a crime investigation, it involves a lot of team effort and cooperation.

"I thought that team-building events with detective themes could be a great way for companies to help their staff work better together."

His company, rightangleevents.co.uk, has been in business for 12 years and collects around £ 1.5 million annually. It employs 30 people, including Steve's wife, Kate. In a popular setting, the company's staff works together to rescue its executive director who has been "kidnapped." In another, they must join forces as forensic investigators of the crime scene to solve a murder.

Advice: Understand what basic skills you have acquired in your career and how they could be applied to other roles.

I left the city for my garden.

After leaving her position as executive director of a City recruiting firm, Elizabeth Jackson turned her hand to a flower-growing business that is flourishing year after year.

After leaving her position as executive director of a City recruiting firm, Elizabeth Jackson turned her hand to a flower-growing business that is flourishing year after year.

After leaving her role as executive director of a City recruiting firm, Elizabeth Jackson was very happy to change her high heels for Wellington boots.

The 57-year-old woman, who lives in Harrogate, North Yorkshire, has now turned to a flower-growing business that is flourishing year after year. "I loved my job, but I had reached a point where I wanted to spend more time at home with my husband, David, and do something different."

"I'm lucky to have a two-acre garden, that's how the flowers were born from thegarden.co.uk I think gardening is technically challenging and intellectually demanding, and seeing the end result is wonderful."

Elizabeth grows peas, dahlias, peonies, roses and tulips to sell to florists and produce stores. Its goal is to help reduce air miles while keeping everything local. Making a lot of money was not Elizabeth's priority after leaving her job well paid, but she covers her costs and manages the business as a non-profit organization.

Advice: Take inspiration and tips on how to start a new career when you leave your full-time job at next-up.com.

The bees gave me a sweet success.

Simon Cavill has created a successful natural range for honey-based skin care that is stored in Waitrose and sold online from his website beegood.co.uk

Simon Cavill has created a successful natural range for honey-based skin care that is stored in Waitrose and sold online from his website beegood.co.uk

From the design of banking technology to the creation of a home for bees, many things have changed since Simon Cavill retired 11 years ago. The 58-year-old man from Basingstoke, Hampshire, has created a successful range of skin care products based on natural honey that is stored in Waitrose and sold online from his beegood.co.uk website.

"Technology can be a stressful and aggressive industry to work with, and my love of beekeeping was what kept me sane," he says.

Simon and his wife, Caroline, spent hours reading centuries-old beekeeping books and found a recipe for making cosmetics with honey.

"This is how it all started," says Simon. & # 39; We made lip balms and hand creams to sell at local fairs. But it was not until I took early retirement in 2008 that the business really started.

& # 39; We put our hearts and souls into it and began to bear fruit. What makes our range so popular is that we use only British products, which are hard to come by. We work with British farmers across the country and we have almost 300 beehives & # 39;

Advice: Test the demand for your product starting little by little. Listen to the comments of your first customers and use them to improve your brand.